Norway Part 2, The Islands

Lofoten:

Ah, the Lofoten…

This group of islands well above the Polar Circle. I wished to visit them for a long time already.

I arrived with the ferry from Bodo around 21:00 hrs and cycled with a German couple, Kessi and Matthias towards Lofoten’s southern tip, the village A.  The camping didn’t welcome tents anymore, but I saw already an allright wild camping spot on the way in.

At first, there’s no alternative for the E10.  It’s a small road here and they kept the old track around the tunnels open for cyclist.

A MUST do (with thanks to Kessi for the tip) is the hike up the hill just before entering Reine village.    It’s a hard, steep and at times slippery way to the ridge from sea level to 487 m, but the view you get is not possible to catch in a picture (for me at last 😉  ).

It is of utmost importance to take your time when you visit these islands and not simply rush trough over the main artery, the E10.  Take side trips !

Some of them are along dead end roads, but are definitely worth the effort.  That way I visited Nusfjord, the beautiful beaches of Utakleiv, the Venice of the North (another one….) Henningsvaer and made round trips along the fjords south of Leknes, at Austvago, etc…

There are going to be a lot of pics in this one, I’m sorry…

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Near the southern tip of the Lofoten.
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The E10 is a dead end road with a parking lot at the end.

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Love the small ship in the picture.
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The view on the hike up near Reine. Picture cannot show at all how spectaculair it really is.

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In Nusfjord
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Nusfjord
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The dead end road to Nusfjord
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The old road around the tunnel to Utakleiv.
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I had a spectacular camping spot along that old road (closed for traffic).
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The camping along the old road is better as on the beach down, where you have camper vans, and all the noises that are coming with it.

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And down there at the beach, they don’t have the visitors I get.
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Shakira arrived in the morning by helicopter to her yacht.

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Leaving the E10, you will do many extra kilometers, but you’ll be riding on these narrow deserted roads.

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The detour along Gimsoy peninsula towards Hov showed a complete different landscape then the rest from Lofoten.

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The lighthouse at Hov, where I camped along the beach, watching the midnight sun.

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Kessi and Matthias. Love the little tea pot on the panier.
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Henningsvaer.
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Along the dead end road to Henningsvaer.
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Along the dead end road to Henningsvaer.
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After Henningsvaer there’s a tunnel.But there’s also an old road.And look what you get, taking that one ….. 🙂

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At the highest point of the old road, you can take a nice walk up to the hill with good views in the next pics.

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Lofoten Cathedral.

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Not a bad place to lay your head.  Another wild camping spot taking the small roads along Austvagoy.

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Just before Fiskebol, I left the main road to have a better look at the beach.

That’s where I think I lost my Gorilla (tri) pod.

For a few days I felt miserable about that and wanted to punish myself by standing in the corner for an hour or so, but that’s when I realized that since I’m living outside 24/7, there are no corners anymore in my life.

I could do it when I take a ferry from one island to the other, but I guess the other passengers might find it odd, when I stand in the corner the whole passage.

Besides, I have too many things to do on board of the ferry.  Filling up my water bottles, washing myself a bit in the rest room, maybe do some laundry there as well, taking pictures, pay for the passage, eating lunch, or second lunch, ….

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A view from the Lofoten Islands to the Vesteralen Islands.
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The church where I lost the gorillapod.  The mountains of Vesteralen in the background.
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The last fjord on the Lofoten certainly was a good one.

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Last view towards Lofoten.

Vesteralen:

The Vesteralen are a group of islands north of Lofoten.

There too, I mostly took the ‘long way’ around the islands, avoiding the bigger roads.  I had bad whether with lots of rain and one night a storm which became so violent I simply had to break down the tent and sleep in the sanitary facilities.  I’m used to heavy winds in the tent, even holding poles and supporting it from the inside, but this one became way to violent.

I’m not moaning about the wind too much, but still, it is mostly against.  That much that frequently my speed goes into single digits on the flats.

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First kilometer on Vesteralen

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Briliant hut where I spend the night before the stormy one.

 

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Inside the hut.
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Ready for another day fighting against the winds.

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I saw sea eagles frequently.  This one fighting with another bird.

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They ‘ve got these buttons you’ve got to push before entering the tunnels.  Some tunnels even have boxes from which you can take fluo jackets if you wish to use them.

Senja:

Leaving the supermarket in Andenes, I met Dutch cyclist Jos with who I cycled for a day towards the island Senja.

Senja should be one of the most beautiful Norwegian islands, north-east of the Vesteralen.

It’s quiet a long ferry ride and it was still raining when we arrived there.

Late in the afternoon and a big part of the next day, I was very lucky and the sun came out, so I could so how beautiful the region is.

Before arriving in the biggest city of the north, Tromso, I had one more island to cross, Kvaloya Island, where it rained so much that I don’t have to bother anybody with pictures from it.

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Selfie.  Haven’t got a hair cut since leaving home in April 😦
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After a pretty long climb, I arrived art Bergsfjord and wild camped near the water.
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Wild Camping spot at Bergsfjord on Senja.
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Pics from the camping spot.
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Pics from the camping spot.

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Mefjorden
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Norway Part 1, The North

I entered Norway in the province Nord-Trøndelag.
Sweden’s road 340 becomes road nbr 765 here.
Near Ostnes, I pushed my 3000th km of this trip away.
In my quest to avoid highway 6 as much as possible, I continued north via small roads, cycling along Tunnsjoen lake which has a huge island in it, a rock 812 meter high.
I was traveling through a winter wonderland now, full of snow and ice.
Instead of taking the tunnel after Gjersvika, I took the old road over the mountains, Steinfjellvei. This old road is blocked for car traffic, so you are really mounting into heaven, car-free.
Oh, what are people taking those tunnels missing….

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Tunnsjoen lake with the big 812 m high rock inside.

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This was such a beautiful place I decided to pitch the tent next to the lake and spend the night here.
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Find the tent.  Great camping spot.  It got too hot inside the next morning at 4:45 hrs due to the sun.

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In Namsskogan, a little town along the E6, I joined the highway for about 40 km, before entering the Fiplingvatnet valley, following the Villmarksveien.
By this time, I had entered my second Norwegian province on this trip, ‘Nordland’ and officially entered North-Norway..

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Roma 3101 km ?? As the crow flies.  I have that distance on the odo-meter, starting from Belgium.

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This is how a Norwegian train station looks like from the inside. At the country side at least.
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Sour skulls 😛

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The Fiplingvalley along Villmarksveien

Between Trofors and Mosjoen, the E6 can be avoided by cycling dirt roads on the other side of the river. Steep climbs and descents between 10 & 12% await you.

After Mosjoen, I headed via road 78 (largely car free, as it is closed to motorized traffic, who are forced to take the new toll-tunnel) towards Norway’s most famous road, coastal road nbr 17.
Road 17 means incredible views towards the sea, cycling around fjords which makes progress slow but beautiful, it means tunnels, ferry-crossings and camper vans.

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Alternative gravel road for the busy E6
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Wild camping along Vefsnfjorden.
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What view did you have, waking up this morning ?

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After the ferry dropped me in Nesna, I had to climb pretty high up a hill, but was rewarded with stunning views into the Sjona Fjord.

On the 5th of June, 51 days and exactly 3.368 km after I left from home, I crossed the Polar Circle.
But not on my bike. It lay there, right in front of me…… in the water. So I passed it on the ferry.

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Another great wild camping spot in a field on hill.  The sun doesn’t set anymore so it’s nice and warm inside the tent all night long.

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German cyclist Ole who joined me to the glacier later on.
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Danish Cyclist Kenneth, on an e-bike to the North-Cape.

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Passing the Arctic or Polar Circle at 66.34 degrees.
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View from another wild camping side.

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I met a nice German couple who were cycling from the North Cape to Gibraltar. They gave me the tip to visit Svartisen Glacier. I did this together with Ole, a young German cyclist who’s cycling around Scandinavia.
A tiny ferry dropped us near the glacier. We hiked up to the glaciers mouth in the evening. As with every glacier, you cannot help but notice how far and how fast they are retreating.
Late in the evening (it’s already 24/24 light up here) we reached the mouth of the glacier, which is 3 or 4 men high. The bright blue and white colors are very spectacular and must be even better when the sun is shining.
We planned to camp 2 nights below the glacier, and climb up higher the next day.
This turned out to be a day of non-stop rain, hail, ice rain and fresh snow a few hundred meters above us. It became a rest/reading day during which I re-read George Orwell’s ‘Burmese Days’.

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Our tiny ferry which will bring us and the bikes to the glacier.
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Obviously it’s retreating very fast.

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Unreal patterns.

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After the rest day, I cycled again a day against hard head winds. Cycling around fjords, you cycle in every direction during the day, but still the wind manages to blow BANG in your face, whichever direction you turn your handle bars. Remarkable.
It looked like an autumn storm, how the leaves were torn from the trees and were blown around ones head.

After Ornes, the road to Bodo becomes to busy.  Cars, mobil homes, trucks; the constant roar of traffic in your ears and all your attention goes to staying on ‘your’ few centimeters at the edge of the road, instead of enjoying the scenery.

The first day after Ornes, the weather was truly horrible.  Cold, rain, hail.  And head wind of course.  There ’s one more tunnel, but the old road can still be taken by bicycle.  It’s a bit steep and extra 200 meters of climbing, but the view at the other side of the top is worthwhile.

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I was lucky to find a really nice wild camping spot a bit before Saltstraumen, where you’ll find the strongest tidal current in the world.

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The last day into Bodo, the weather was warm and sunny.  People were out in town, terraces and restaurants were packed.  I headed to the harbor to catch my ferry to the Lofoten islands.

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Bodo

 

Sweden Part 2, the Middle.

I left Sysslebäck, a village alongside the Klarälven river at 18:40 hrs only.
The whole day the rain had been pouring down.
A few km north of the village, I made a right turn and started mounting into the hills, going from 160 meters to just under 600 m.
I’m 5 weeks into this trip now, but still my physical condition doesn’t seem top. I can’t say I suffer, but, the climbing does not go easy.
Near the top of the hill are some chalets for rent, I guess for cross country skiers in winter.
It’s all deserted now.
The road descends a bit towards Eggsjön lake, where I hope to find a spot to pitch my tent.
Just when I start descending, it starts raining again and the moment I unpack my tent, it’s a real downpour. Damnit, couldn’t that wait for another 5 minutes.
I crawled into a wet tent and didn’t bother eating anymore.

Next day, Saturday May 21st, was cloudy but a very beautiful cycling day over gravel roads. I stayed high on some plateau, always between 400 & 500 m.o.h., passing several lakes like, Tasjön, Tossan, Tisjön & Grycken. The one even more beautiful then the other.

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I took some mountainbike single trails going into Rörbäcksnäs, a little town with even an outdoor store. Again, the part I was looking for for my stove was not available. I had a chat with the friendly shopkeeper. We checked the weather and it seemed it was gonna rain tomorrow Sunday evening and Monday morning.

As it was dry and too early in the day to stop, I said goodbye to the people from the outdoor store, bought some provision in the local supermarket and continued my ride towards the Norwegian border. Quiet an unexpected climb.
Near Stoa, I made a left turn into the Ljordalen and 6 km further on, I found a fantastic spot to pitch the tent, right next to a wide bend in the river, facing an almost 1000 m high hill.

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Sometimes, I thinkI just go a bit too far in searching traffic free roads 🙂

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Sunday came and I woke up to an overcast sky. Apart from a bit of condensation, I could pack the tent away dry, backed some sausages for breakfast, lubed my chain and tightened it with the eccenter. Just when I was ready doing all this and packed everything away, it started raining.
I smiled. Perfect timing.
However, Sunday morning still was half a day too early according to the forecasts.
And raining it did.
Just after I crossed the border back into Sweden, I saw a small wooden shelter. 37 km on the odometer wasn’t a lot, but even with the best raining gear, you start to feel uncomfortable after a few hours continuous rain.
I put on some dry, warm clothes, made pasta, read a bit, but the rain wouldn’t stop.
On my gps I saw there would be another shelter 2 km’s further down the road and decided to give that one a try for the night.
I was hoping for some kind of small wooden house with 4 walls, protecting you from the elements, but it turned out to be the same kind of wooden shelter I was 2 km back. A 2 m by 2 m shed with an open front. At least this one had a wooden floor i.o. a muddy one.
I made a construction with the small plastic tarp I carried with me to have at least some protection.

It rained all night. I’d put my empty coffee mug outside in the evening and this morning it was more than half full with rain water. That must be about 40 mm of rain during the last 10 hrs. The forecast spoke between 2 & 5 mm.

And it continued raining all day.
And I stayed in my hovel. Reading books, drinking tea and coffee.

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The first shelter with muddy floor.
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2nd shelter with a nice wooden floor, but they forget to built one wall.

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Next morning, Tuesday 24th May, it had stopped raining when I woke up.

Of course, by the time I ‘d had breakfast and packed all my stuffed, it was raining again.
The barometer kept going down as well, which promised no improvement.
41 hrs in this shed was more then enough, so I decided to leave anyway.
A head wind.
Ah well, Mp3 on, some summer music in my ears to soften ‘the misery’, and go.

I was near the highest waterfall of Sweden now, but decided not to have a look. I saw enough water falling the last days. And anyway, I had to keep moving just to keep my body warm.
15 km or so after Gördalen, there were signs on the road that the road I was coming from was blocked. I’d seen some heavy machinery going up and down the day before, but apparently they couldn’t fix it.
I took a left turn, a 15 km gravel (and mud) road north towards Idre.
Idre was half flooded. The guy in the tourist office said the lake rose 60 cm over night. He also said the road was blocked just beyond my shed. That must be just before the Norwegian border. Whole parts were flooded. I guess I’m lucky I cycled these 2 km to the 2nd shed last Saturday, or I would still be up there. On the Norwegian side many roads were closed as well, the guy said.

From Idre, I headed further north, direction Foskros.
After about 6 km I pitched my tent at a nice ‘natural campground’, just along the swollen river.

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Continuing north, after Foskros I had a nice 23 km gravel road, passing the most Southern Sami village in the world.
At the junction with the main road, I met Frans and his wife, a nice Dutch couple traveling with their mobil home. They fed me, and would continue doing that the day after.

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In the afternoon, I cycled through Hogdalen, the highest Swedish village.

Also the next day, Thursday 26th may was a day of extremities. First I passed the highest church in Sweden in Tännäs. After Tännäs, I followed a good gravel road for 15 km towards Funasdalen.

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Sweden’s “highest” church.

From Funasdalen, it’s all gravel till the end of the day, 60 km further on.
A steep 10% climb leads you out of the village, but all this altitude I will win and loose several times again, until I reach a true highlight,cycling over the highest mountain pass in Sweden (Flatruet, 975 m.o.h.).
Make no mistake, this doesn’t seem very high, but the going is very tough and very steep.
I’m in Samiland now.
Going down Flatruet, I decide to make a shortcut, following the valley of the Skarkan river. A mistake, because this is a 12 km wet clay & mud road, sucking in your tires.

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Where I’m coming from.
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And going too 🙂
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Highest pass in Sweden.
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Beyond the pass.

Just before entering the village Börtnan, I took a left turn, on another 40 km or so gravel road which leads along the Oviks mountain range. Lot’s of swamps and wetlands here, very beautiful, but no suitable place to pitch the tent, so I camped Galabodarna at a place where they rent out cabins.

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After a night on the campground on Fröso, a little island in the lake next to Östersund, I headed towards the Norwegian border taking road 340, the sun above my head and the wind in my back.. This road should become a bicycle classing. All paved (nice change after all the gravel the last days), not too much climbing and stunning scenery. It’s called the ‘Fiskevagen’ (fishroad), probably because you cycle from one lake to the next.

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Leaving Sweden, I had 2910 km on the odo-meter.
Sweden has been very kind to me.
The weather was reasonable, I saw plenty of reindeer and moose, found lots of y beloved gravel/dirt roads and above all, it’s car and truck drivers are the best and most respectful towards cyclist I have ever seen.

A country that begs for further exploration.

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The Swedish roadside toilets are heaven for cyclists.
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Always super-clean, and they even have decoration to make your time inside comfortable.
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Leaving a top-country.

Total kilometer Sweden: 1.200 km
Average km per cycling day: follows later

Total kilometer so far: 2.910 km
Total altimeter so far: 15.873 meter
Total time on the bike: 185 hrs 0 min

Nights slept inside: 0
Nights slept outside: 18 (3 on campgrounds, 15 wild camping)
Average daily cost Sweden:

Zweden
Route – Sweden